Friday, December 25, 2009

Merry Christmas from Anarae

ANARAE

My great niece on
Christmas Day!
At only 18 months of age,
she can read 35 words and is learning more everyday.
I couldn't be more proud!!!!!
And, of course, she's named after me!

Merry Christmas!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Merry Christmas from Poppett!!

Poppett,
our beloved Shih Tzu,
wishes you a very
Merry Christmas!

She was 10 1/2 years old yesterday.

Christmas Eve Gift!


CHRISTMAS EVE GIFT!

Since I was a child, it has been a tradition in our family that the first one to shout 'Christmas Eve Gift'
gets to open one of their presents on Christmas Eve.


I've decided to carry this tradition over to my blog.
Therefore,
the first person to email me with
"Christmas Eve Gift"
in the subject line
will receive a surprise gift from me.

My email address is
beads@bledsoe.net

There is no time limit on this little game.
You will be notified via this blog when the entry has been made.

Merry Christmas to All!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Merry Christmas


We are just back from a short cruise and I thought I'd let you see that we clean up pretty nicely. I wasn't feeling well on formal night, so you will have to miss seeing my handsome guy in his tuxedo until next time.

I thought I'd let you know that we went Christmas shopping Monday, and every single sales person wished us a Merry Christmas! Perhaps it takes the tragedy of a depression to bring folks around to the basics of goodness. There's hope yet!

Merry Christmas to you all!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Merry Christmas! We got started late getting ready for the season and we're just as late finishing. Our shopping is finished. Yay! Our Christmas card are ready, but not addressed (I always make my own cards.) I have a few small handmade gifts to make. Our tree is up, but not decorated.

Our 200 CD changer decided to die as we played the first Christmas song. Ray took the changer completely apart. He did repair it, but I held my breath with all of those tiny parts laying around.

Cookies have been baked - and consumed - so we'll have to start that one over. The party mix has also been consumed.

Merry Christmas to All and to All a Good Night!

Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Creme Caramel Recipe

This is one of my all-time favorite recipes, but it seems particularly appropriate at Christmas. It lends a lovely light dessert after a heavy meal. I love it and your guests will love you for it!!

This recipe is adapted from Susan Branch.


Creme Caramel


3 eggs
w egg yolks
1/2 cup sugar
2 cups hot milk
1 cup hot cream
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3/4 cups sugar
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Beat eggs and yolks together, just enough to blend. Heat milk and cream together. Stir 1/2 cup sugar into eggs. Slowly add hot milk mixture to egg mixture, stirring constantly. Add vanilla extract.

To make caramel:

Put 3/4 cup sugar into dry skillet over medium heat. Swirl pan, but don't stir. Cook until deep caramel in color. (The sugar dries out quickly as it cools, so work quickly.) Divide the caramel among 8 buttered ramekins, swirling each dish to distribute caramel.

Line a roasting pan with a towel and set the ramekins onto the towel. Pull out the middle rack of the oven and place roasting pan on the rack. Pour boiling water into the roasting pan about 1" deep. Pour the custard into the ramekins, filling about 3/4" full.

Bake for about 45 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes our clean.

Cool, then chill, covered in the refrigerator.

To serve, cut tightly around ramekin.

Invert a small bowl over the ramekin. Turn both upside down. The caramel will slide out on top of the pudding, creating a pool of deliciousness.

Monday, November 23, 2009

Carnival Holiday Cruise



We recently returned from 2 cruises on the Carnival Holiday. We heard 2 stories: that the Holiday has been decommissioned and the it has been taken to Italy to specialize in Mediterranean cruises.

We had cruised with Carnival before and swore we'd never do it again. The price for these back to back cruises was just too good to pass up, so off we went. The Holiday was a lovely ship and the line has shown great improvement.

We were told that our tips would be included in our final bill - which they were. But unlike other ships that have tips included, the waiters, stewards, etc. were standing in our way with their hands out. There were many people that I would like to have tipped extra, but didn't, because I think it is poor policy to require that tips be paid and then ask for more.

Another complaint is that the ship used the docks that were farthest from town or any central attraction, so there was no way to get off the boat and just stroll around without paying the ship to take you somewhere or hiring a cab. (We chose to take cabs.)

As a whole the cruise was very nice, but I'm back to my original feelings regarding Carnival Cruise Line - I will not sail with them again.

Ruth Ann
r2swanger.etsy.com
beadkits.etsy.com

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Orientation to Beads

I just found a fabulous site for learning about beads, threads, wires, metals, etc. Be sure and click on:

http://www.blog.landofodds.com/orientation-to-beads/

to read all the details. Fabulous!

Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com
http://www.beadkits.etsy.com

Thursday, October 8, 2009

As Ek Sing

This is the most beautiful song I've ever heard. It is sung in South Africa, so I don't know what it means, but I love it anyway!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw2s1Ymn5iA

Enjoy
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com
http://www.beadkits.etsy.com
http://www.raggbaggs.blogspot.com

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Greaat People and Great Things

October Events


10 - In 1881, the Shootout at the O.K. Corral took place, spawning over 200 Western movies starring everyone from The Marx Brothers to Kevin Costner. Groucho Marx as Wyatt Earp? Hmmm.....
9 - Mrs. O'Leary's cow kicks over a lantern, starting the 1871 Great Fire of Chicago, and coincidentally, also marks the invention of the barbequed steak.
8 - John Lennon was born in Liverpool, England in 1940.
7 - In 54 A.D., Roman Emperor Claudius died after eating poisonous mushrooms prepared for him by his wife, the Empress Agrippina.
6 - 1871, Thomas Edison successfully tested the world's first electric incandescent light bulb.
5 - Ninety members of the Donner party departed Illinois in 1846, headed for California. Amazingly, there were 48 survivors of the horrific sinter in the Sierras.
4 - The Statue of Liberty was dedicated in 1886. A gift from the people of France to commemorate the French-American alliance during the revolutionry War.
3 - In 1938 Orson Wells radio broadcast of 'The War of the Worlds' panicked millions of Americans who believed the Martain invasion was real.
2 - Queen Marie Antoinette was beheaded following the French Revolution. The wife of King Louis XVI had become the symbol of everything in the French Monarchy.
1 - An ancient traditional celebration combining the Christian festival of All Saints with the Pagan autumn festivals becomes the most fun October day of all - Halloween!
Happy Haunting!
Ruth Ann

Friday, October 2, 2009

October


OCTOBER:

October Flower of the Month: The Calendula & Cosmos.

Zodiac Signs: Libra / The Scales, Sept. 23 - Oct. 23.

Scorpio / The Scorpion, Oct. 24 - Nov. 21.
The Name for the Moon: for October is Hunter's Moon

The Full Moon is: October 4, 2009/ 06:11 / Sunday

October Birthstone: Opal, Tourmaline, Pink Sapphire

Meaning: Hope



About the month of October

October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with a length of 31 days. The eighth month in the old Roman calendar, October retained its name (from the Latin "octo" meaning "eight") when January and February were added. October's birthstone is the opal or tourmaline, and its birth flower is the calendula (pot marigold) or Camellia.
October is commonly associated with the season of autumn in the Northern hemisphere and spring in the Southern hemisphere, where it is the seasonal equivalent to April in the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa. October starts on the same day of the week as January in common years.

Have a great, spooky month!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com
http://www.beadkits.etsy.com
http://www.raggbaggs.blogspot.com

Haloween Bracelet


My Halloween Bracelet
is now available completed
at
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com
or
as a kit
at
http://www.beadkits.etsy.com

This bracelet is
a pleasure to make
and a
delight to wear!

Enjoy!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com
http://www.beadkits.etsy.com

Mulled Apple Cider with Calvados



MULLED APPLE CIDER WITH CALVADOS

4 cups apple cider
4 cups cranberry juice
1 orange, thinly sliced
1 teaspoons allspice berries
1 whole nutmeg
2 cinnamon sticks
1 cup Calvados

Bring all ingredients to a boil over medium-low heat. Cook for 15 minutes. Strain liquid into crockpot. Add brandy and set crockpot to low to keep hot until serving time. If you wish, you can set the crockpot on the table and surround it with fall or Christmas greens, fruit, and flowers. Serve into cups and garnish with extra orange slices and cinnamon sticks.

Enjoy!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com
http://www.beadkits.etsy.com

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Sour Cream Cake Recipe


Sour Cream Cake


Ingredients:
1/2 lb butter
3 cups sugar
8 oz sour cream
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
3 cups flour
6 eggs

Directions:
Preheat oven to 325. Grease and flour one bundt pan. In a large bowl, cream the butter then add sugar and cream well. In another bowl, mix together sour cream, baking soda and vanilla together. Add to sugar mixture and combine thoroughly. Stir in 1 cup flour, beat in 2 eggs. Repeat for the rest of the flour and eggs. Bake for about 1 hour and 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Leave in the pan on the cooling rack for 10 minutes, then invert, and if you can wait, let cool then serve.

Guiness Cupcakes


  • 1 cup stout (Guinness or other Irish full-bodied beer)
  • 1 cup butter, room temperature
  • ¾ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1½ tsp baking soda
  • ¾ tsp salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • ⅔ cup sour cream

Ganache Filling

  • 8 oz bittersweet chocolate
  • ⅔ cup heavy cream
  • 2 tbsp butter, room temperature
  • 1-2 tbsp of Irish whiskey

Frosting

  • 3-4 cups confectioners sugar
  • 1 stick of butter, room temperature
  • 4 oz (2 nips) of Bailey's Irish Cream or other Irish cream liqueur

Special Equipment

  • cupcake tins
  • cupcake liners

Bake Cupcakes

  1. Preheat oven to 350ยบ. Line 24 cupcake tins with liners
  2. Bring stout and 1 cup of butter to a simmer in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add cocoa powder and whisk until mixture is smooth. Let cool slightly
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder and ¾ tsp of salt to blend
  4. In a large bowl beat eggs and sour cream to blend. Add the stout chocolate mixture and beat to combine. Add flour mixture and beat briefly on a slow speed. Using a spatula, fold batter until completely combined
  5. Divide batter and bake until tester comes out clean or about 17 minutes

Make Ganache Filling

  1. Chop up the chocolate and transfer it to a heatproof bowl
  2. Heat the cream in a saucepan until it is simmering and pour it over the chocolate. Let this sit for a minute and stir until smooth
  3. Add the butter and whiskey, stir to combine. Let this cool until thick. (You can refrigerate it so that it’s nice and thick)
  4. Once your cupcakes are cool enough, poke each cupcake in center to create a well. Pipe ganache into these wells

Make Frosting

  1. Whip the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer for several minutes
  2. Slowly add powdered sugar and combine. Mix in Bailey's
  3. Pipe frosting onto cupcakes

Monday, September 21, 2009

Note Burning and New Church

Yesterday, September 20, 2009, we had a note burning at The Church of Christ at Bethel. It was expected that it would take about 15 years to pay off the note, but due to generous 5th Sunday contributions, it was paid off in 5 short years.

Our land was donated by Bill Staggs, Sr. Today Steve and Bill Staggs, Jr. donated 4 more acres for an even newer building. It seems that in only 5 years, we have filled our church over capacity (400) several times. (Not bad for a tiny community in a small country town!) I don't know when the new building will be started, but Ray and I plan to do our best to help.

The primary cause for our congregation growing so quickly is due to our wonderful ministers, Terry Smith and Bobby Collier. They tend to talk too much about being old, but they're younger than I am, so they will never be old. They are both learned men with a great deal of love in their hearts. They teach and encourage rather than demand. Besides that, they are both awfully cute! We thank God for them and pray that they will be with us for a very long time.

Ruth Ann

Friday, September 18, 2009

Irish Blessing

May the Good Lord take a liking to you... but not too soon!

Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Pink Sangria Iced Tea Recipe

Pink Sangria Iced Tea

(serves 5)
2 cups boiling water
4 orange herb tea bags
3 tablespoons sugar
2 cups cranberry juice cocktail
1 cup dry white wine

Pour boiling water over bags and let steep for about 5 minutes. Remove bags from water and stir in sugar. Let cool. Stir in juice and wine.
Serve over ice with a ring of frozen orange slice.


I found this fabulous recipe at
http://www.gritsandglamour.blogspot.com

Barb's blog is simply marvelous.
I spend way too much time reading her blog,
but the time is never wasted!
Drop by and visit her!

Have a fabulous day!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Make Your Own Balth Salts

Bath Salts Mix

Three cups of Epsom Salt,
One tablespoon of glycerin and a couple of drops of essential oil,
such as lavender or eucalyptus.
You can add a few drops of food coloring.
Put into a pretty glass jar.
For a soothing bath, place 1/2 to 3/4 cup of this mixture into the hot water.

Enjoy!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Julia Child's Cake

REINE DE SABA
(Chocolate and Almond Cake)

CAKE:
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
2/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
3 large eggs, separated
Pinch salt
4 ounces semisweet chocolate, melted with 2 tablespoons rum OR brewed coffee
1/3 cup finely pulverized (ground) almonds
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
3/4 cup sifted cake flour, returned to sifter

CHOCOLATE BUTTER ICING:
1 ounce (1 square) semisweet chocolate, finely chopped
1 tablespoon rum OR brewed coffee
3 tablespoons unsalted butter

To make Cake, butter and flour an 8-inch diameter cake pan that's at least 1 1/2 inches deep. In a 3-quart mixing bowl, cream butter and 2/3 cup sugar together with an electric mixture for several minutes until mixture is fluffy and pale yellow. Beat in egg yolks until well blended. Beat egg whites and pinch of salt in medium bowl until soft peaks form. Add remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and beat until stiff peaks form.
Fold chocolate mixture into butter-sugar mixture, then stir in almonds and almond extract. Fold in 1/4 of whites to lighten batter. Fold in 1/3 of remaining whites. Sift 1/3 of flour over and fold in. Fold in remaining whites alternately with flour in 2 more additions each.
Turn batter into prepared cake pan, push the batter up to its rim with a rubber spatula. Bake on middle level of a preheated 350-degree oven, about 25 minutes or until cake has puffed and 2 1/2 to 3 inches around the circumference are set so that a tested in that area comes out clean. Center should move slightly if pan is shaken. Cool cake in pan 10 minutes. Run a knife around edges of pan and reverse cake on a rack to cool completely, an hour or two.
Cake must be cold to ice.
Meanwhile, make Chocolate Butter Icing. In a small metal bowl set over a small saucepan of not quite simmering water, combine chocolate and rum. Stir until chocolate is melted and smooth. Remove bowl from water. Beat butter into chocolate, a tablespoon at a time. Then beat over cold water until chocolate mixture is cool and of spreading consistency. Place cake on a platter. At once, spread evenly over the cool cake with a spatula or knife.
Makes 1 (8-inch ) cake, 6 to 8 servings.

From "Mastering the Art of French Cooking: Volume One,
" by Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle and Simone Beck (Knopf, 1961).

Enjoy!
Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Monday, September 14, 2009

Hallowe'en Is Coming!




What Is Halloween?

The word Halloween is from Hallowe'en (1. According to the Irish English dictionary published by the Irish Texts Society: the Night of the Winter Calends, signalizing the close of harvest and the initiation of the winter season, lasting till May 2. Scottish Gaelis Dictionary defines it as Hallowtide. The Feast of All Soula. end of summer.). This is a contraction of All Hallows Eve, or the night before the 'All Hallows', also called 'All Hallowmas', or 'All Saints', or 'All Souls' Day. In old English the word 'Hallow' meant 'sanctify'.

Some History on Halloween Festival!

The festival was first celebrated on February 21, the end of the Roman year. In the 7th century, Pope Boniface IV introduced All Saints' Day to replace the pagan festival of the dead on May 13. Later, Gregory III changed the date to November 1.

Despite this connection with the Roman Church, the American version of Halloween Day celebration owes its origin to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in).

The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. To them, this day marked the end of summer, harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, that was often associated with death. Celts believed that on the night of October 31, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred, it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. Celts thought that the presence of the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids, or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future which were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

During the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins and attempts to make prophecies. After the celebration, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

By A.D. 43, Romans had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years of rule on the Celtic lands, two festivals Feralia (commemorated the passing of the dead) and Pomona (Roman goddess of fruit and trees), were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain.

By the 800s, Christianity influence had spread into Celtic lands. In the seventh century, Pope Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, a time to honor saints and martyrs. It is widely believed today that the pope was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but church-sanctioned holiday. The celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints' Day) and the night before it, the night of Samhain, began to be called All-hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween. Even later, in A.D. 1000, the church would make November 2 All Souls' Day, a day to honor the dead. It was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels, and devils. Together, the three celebrations, the eve of All Saints', All Saints', and All Souls', were called Hallowmas.

This item is now available in my Etsy shop!
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Hatch Peppers

Hatch Peppers

In New Mexico, the claim to fame is Hatch, NM - the chile capital of the world. With Hatch's unique combination of temperature, rain and soil - breeders and botanists have developed a chile pepper that is uniquely their own.
Ristra of Hatch Chilis

Why HATCH?

Of all the pepper (chile/chili) centers in the world, Hatch, New Mexico, stands the tallest. Hatch's plant
breeders and botanists are most unique.

Hatch is widely known as the designer chile/chili headquarters because Mesilla Valley farmers are
constantly developing new breeds and various tastes to satisfy a steady throng of new converts.

They tailor-make chilis, which are then introduced to the locals and consumers from all over the US
and many, many countries around the world like NEW car models via e-commerce and the internet.

Here in New Mexico, many say just by tasting a chili/chile pod they can tell whether the pepper was
grown North, or South of Interstate 40 (formerly US Route 66), which runs from East toward Texas
and West toward Arizona.
Hatch, New Mexico, grows the best chili peppers in the world. They're the
equivalent of Maine Lobster or Gulf Coast shrimp.

You first need to roast them. You can do this in various ways, on a grill, over
an open flame on a gas stove, using a small propane torch, under the broiler,
etc., to char and then remove the skin. I like to do it on the grill
(anything to get out of the house).

On an outdoor grill, fire up enough charcoal to make a single layer under the
chilies. When coals are covered with gray ash, place the chilies directly over the fire.
Grill chilies, turning frequently, until their skins are blackened. Transfer chilies to
paper bag to steam until cool enough to handle. Peel chilies using rubber gloves if
your skin is sensitive (and DON'T rub your eyes), and cut chilies into 1/3-inch strips
called rajas. You can then use then immediately or freeze them until you are ready
to use them.

And here are some recipes using them:

HATCH GREEN CHILI SALSA

(Yield: 11/2 quarts)

2 quarts water

1/2 pound fresh tomatillos (see cook's notes)

1/2 pound fresh serrano chili peppers (see cook's notes)

1 pound roasted Hatch green chili peppers

1/3 bunch cilantro

3 medium cloves garlic, peeled

1 medium white onion, peeled and diced

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Cook's note: Tomatillos look like small green tomatoes with a papery, round husk.
Cook's note: To adjust the heat of the salsa, use more or fewer serrano chilies, as desired.

1. Place water in large pot and add tomatillos, serrano chilies, Hatch chilies, cilantro,
garlic and onion. Bring to boil and simmer for 30 minutes.

2. Strain liquid into a container and place solid ingredients in blender. (You may have to work
in batches.) Add 1/2 of the strained liquid to blender and blend until smooth.

3. Add lime juice and salt and blend 30 seconds. Chill before serving.

Presentation: Serve with chips, tortillas or in recipes calling for salsa. Can be stored in a sealed container for 4 days in the refrigerator.

(Nutritional information (per 1/2 cup): 16 calories, 0.18 grams fat, no saturated fat,
no cholesterol, 535 milligrams sodium, 10 percent calories from fat.)

Source: Steve Stanley, Chuy's Restaurant


GRILLED GREEN ONIONS AND RAJAS

(Yield: 6 servings)

3 fresh poblano chilies or large New Mexican chilies such as Sandias or Hatch

12 large green onions

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Dash of Maggi seasoning or pinch of salt (see cook's note)

Juice of 1/2 lime

Cook's note: Maggi seasoning is a dark brown, bottled sauce that resembles soy sauce
in looks and taste. It can be found in Hispanic markets and in the Hispanic section of
some supermarkets.

1. On an outdoor grill, fire up enough charcoal to make a single layer under the
vegetables. When coals are covered with gray ash, place chilies directly over fire.
Grill chilies, turning frequently, until their skins are blackened. Transfer chilies
to paper bag to steam until cool enough to handle.

2. Peel chilies using rubber gloves if your skin is sensitive, and cut chilies into
1/3-inch strips. Keep chili strips, or rajas, warm.

3. Trim any wilted portion of green from tips of onions. Rub onions with oil and
Maggi seasoning, if using.

3. Tear a piece of foil about 6 inches wide. Place it on one side of grill. Arrange
onions so that their green portions are on foil and bulbs are directly over fire.
Grill, turning frequently, until bulbs are soft and lightly browned, 5-10 minutes.
Squeeze lime juice over onions and sprinkle salt over them, if using.

Presentation: Serve onions with rajas and grilled meat.

(Nutritional information (per serving): 31 calories, 2 grams fat, 0.3 grams
saturated fat, no cholesterol, 46 milligrams sodium, 58 percent calories from fat.)

Source: "The Border Cookbook'' by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison
(Harvard Common Press, $14.95)


CHILI-RUBBED FRESH SALMON TACOS

(Yield: 2 tacos)

2 2-ounce salmon filets

Chili rub to taste (see cook's note)

1/2 to 1 tablespoon butter

2 flour tortillas

1/3 cup red cabbage, shredded

6 roasted Hatch green chili strips

1 to 2 tablespoons Jalapeno Lime Sauce (recipe follows)

4 to 6 fresh cilantro leaves

2 small lime wedges for garnish

Cook's note: Chili-rub spice blend can be found in the supermarket spice section.

1. Lightly dust salmon with chili rub.

2. Heat butter in skillet over medium heat and saute salmon, about 2 minutes each side
or until desired doneness. Meanwhile, heat or toast tortillas.

3. To assemble taco, fill tortillas with cabbage and 3 chili strips each. Place salmon atop
cabbage and chilies and top with Jalapeno Lime Sauce and cilantro. Fold tacos and serve
with lime wedges.

(Nutritional information (per serving): 262 calories, 13.5 grams fat, 4 grams saturated
fat, 46 milligrams cholesterol, 231 milligrams sodium, 46 percent calories from fat.)

JALAPENO LIME SAUCE

(Yield: 31/2 to 4 cups)

3 cups commercial Ranch dressing

1/4 cup roasted green chilies

1/4 cup pickled or marinated jalapeno chilies

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

1/3 bunch fresh cilantro

1/2 Roma tomato, diced

1. Place all ingredients in blender and blend until smooth. Chill and use as a salad
dressing or dip for tortilla chips.

(Nutritional information (per 1/3 cup): 165 calories, 16.9 grams fat, 2.5 grams
saturated fat, 18 milligrams cholesterol, 227 milligrams sodium, 92 percent
calories from fat.)

EL PASO GREEN CHILI SOUP

(Yield: 4 to 6 servings)

1/3 cup butter

11/2 medium onions, peeled and chopped

3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

4 cups chicken broth

2 baking potatoes, peeled and diced

11/2 cups chopped roasted green chilies, such as New Mexican Hatch chilies

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup half-and-half

4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, grated

Optional: freshly minced cilantro, for garnish

Optional: toasted thin corn tortilla strips, for garnish

1. In large saucepan or Dutch oven, warm butter over medium heat. Stir in onions
and garlic and saute until translucent.

2. Add broth, potatoes, chilies, oregano and salt and bring mixture to a boil.
Reduce heat to simmer and cook until potatoes are soft, about 30 minutes.

3. Transfer soup to a food processor (or blender in batches) and puree until smooth.
(Soup can be made ahead until this point and refrigerated for a day. Warm soup
before proceeding.)

4. Pour soup back into pan, add half-and-half, and heat through.

Presentation: Divide cheese among serving bowls. Ladle soup into each bowl. Top soup
with cilantro or tortilla strips, if desired. Serve immediately.

(Nutritional information (per serving): 290 calories, 20.1 grams fat, 12.2 grams
saturated fat, 55 milligrams cholesterol, 1263 milligrams sodium,
62 percent calories from fat.)

Source: "The Border Cookbook''


HATCH NEW MEXICAN GREEN CHILI SAUCE (This is waht they mean when
they ask green or red in New Mexico - this is the green option)

(Yield: 4 cups)

3 tablespoons corn oil

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 cup chopped onion

2 teaspoons minced garlic

2 cups roasted, peeled, seeded and chopped New Mexican green chilies

2 cups beef broth

1 teaspoon salt

1. In heavy-bottomed sauce pan, saute onions in corn oil until they begin to brown.

2. Add garlic and cook another 2 minutes.

3. Stir flour in with onions and garlic so that it thickens.

4. Add chopped chilies, beef broth and salt and mix well. Bring to a boil and simmer
10 to 15 minutes to allow mixture to reduce. The sauce should be thick enough to
bind chilies and onions together. Sauce can be refrigerated for three days, or frozen.

Presentation: Serve sauce over enchiladas, grilled pork tenderloin or other grilled
meats and poultry, or as a side with beef tacos. You can also put it over scambled
eggs or a cheese omelet.
In New Mexico they even offer it on hamburgers.

(Nutritional information (per 1/3 cup): 39 calories, 2.7 grams fat, 0.4 grams
saturated fat, no cholesterol, 233 milligrams sodium, 62 percent calories from fat.)

Source: Steve Stanley, Chuy's Restaurant
Sources: http://www.lubbockonline.com/news/100296/hatch.htm
AND My Time in New Mexio






"Ready to cook with some chili peppers?"

by: einlanzer on Aug 27 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Four stars
Ready to cook with some chili peppers? These recipes call for Sandia green chilies,
but you can try substituting a mixture of Anaheims and roasted jalapenos.

HATCH GREEN CHILI SALSA

(Yield: 11/2 quarts)

2 quarts water

1/2 pound fresh tomatillos (see cook's notes)

1/2 pound fresh serrano chili peppers (see cook's notes)

1 pound roasted Sandia green chili peppers

1/3 bunch cilantro

3 medium cloves garlic, peeled

1 medium white onion, peeled and diced

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

DCook's note: Tomatillos look like small green tomatoes with a papery, round husk.
To adjust the heat of the salsa, use more or fewer serrano chilies, as desired.

1. Place water in large pot and add tomatillos, serrano chilies, Sandia chilies, cilantro,
garlic and onion. Bring to boil and simmer for 30 minutes.

2. Strain liquid into a container and place solid ingredients in blender. (You may have to
work in batches.) Add 1/2 of the strained liquid to blender and blend until smooth.

3. Add lime juice and salt and blend 30 seconds. Chill before serving.

Presentation: Serve with chips, tortillas or in recipes calling for salsa. Can be stored in a
sealed container for 4 days in the refrigerator.

(Nutritional information (per 1/2 cup): 16 calories, 0.18 grams fat, no saturated fat,
no cholesterol, 535 milligrams sodium, 10 percent calories from fat.)
Sources: Steve Stanley, Chuy's Restaurant




"Lots of options"

by: newfietom on Aug 28 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Four stars

How many do you have? A dozen? A case? More?

In the parts of the country where chilis are grown -- including Hatch, NM
where they grow the BEST -- you often see roadside stands where you can buy
chilis raw or roasted. The roasting at these stands is done in a large cylindrical
basket with a pretty aggressive propane flame. The basket is rotated either by hand
or by some simple machine attachment. (By the way, foodies... if you're in
"chili country" at harvest time, you will enjoy the smell of roasting
chilis as you drive by farm stand after farm stand selling their product. DELIGHTFUL!!!)

Roasting more than a case (bushel) of chilis would be a big job without this kind of
contraption, but my guess is you don't have that many to roast.

You can do any of the following to get the same basic results:

1. If a couple at a time, just place them directly on your stove burner (gas or electric).
Watch carefully and turn them often until the skin chars black.

2. Broil them on a sheet pan with a rack under your oven's broiler. Watch and turn...
same as above.

3. Use your outdoor grill. Place the chilis directly over a hot bed of coals. Ditto the
watch and turn. Personally, I like this method because of the added flavors the
grill brings to the equation.

4. Fry them in a deep fryer til the skins blister (this is probably not the best way
and I would recommend either of the above first.)

The desired result is twofold: You want to char the skin of the pepper which will
flavor the flesh of the fruit. Second, you want to remove the skins. To accomplish this,
place the HOT chilis in a sealable plastic bag, paper sack (doubled and folded over
at the top) or other sealable vessel. The residual heat will loosen the skin and make
them easy to remove.
Then, if you're not going to use all you've roasted immediately, simply place them in a freezer
bag (I use smaller bags with single-use portions) and toss them in the freezer.


Google Map
Full-screen

Where the BEST chili is grown!

Address:

Hatch, NM
Get directions:

Enter your starting address
Location
Directions
Map data ©2009 Tele Atlas, INEGI - Terms of Use
Map
Satellite
Hybrid
push-pin
You can often get a fresh case shipped to you. Try an internet search.





"This is a site with some recipes for using Hatch peppers"

by: KathyB on Aug 23 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Three stars
This is for a lot of recipes.

http://www.nmchili.com/recipes.htm



There is also a Hatch Cookbook if you want to go that far. This link will give you sources
to get it.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=hatch+cookbook&btnG=Google+Search

Sources: nmchili.com




"Classically, Chiles Rellenos."

by: PamPerdue on Aug 24 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Three stars
The classic recipe for peppers like those is Chiles Rellenos (stuffed with cheese,
covered in batter, and deep-fried.) The link goes to a recipe.

To prepare the fresh chiles, you need to roast them. Basically, you subject them to very
high heat (directly in the flame of a gas stove, over a very hot grill, or under the broiler)
until the skins turn black and blistered. Then you throw them in a paper bag, to let the
steam loosen the skins. When cool enough to handle, rub the skins off.

For Rellenos, you make a slit, remove the seeds, and stuff.

The deep-frying step is a pain, so what you can do at that point is to just chop the chiles
and use them in just about any Mexican dish. They make a nice stuffing for enchiladas,
added to quesadillas, etc.

They freeze very well at that point. People in Hatch (and the rest of New Mexico) will buy
their chiles 50 pounds at a time, roast them (the grocery store will roast them for you),
and freeze them in small tubs to use all year long.

The chiles in Hatch are the most prized for this purpose. For those who have to buy
their chiles pre-frozen, the Bueno brand is favored. You can use your homemade
chopped roasted chiles in any of their recipes.

"Hatch, New Mexico, grows the best chili peppers in the world. They're the equivalent of
Maine Lobster or Gulf Coast shrimp.

You first need to roast them. You can do this in various ways, on a grill, over an open flame
on a gas stove, using a small propane torch, under the broiler, etc., to char and then remove
the skin. I like to do it on the grill (anything to get out of the house).

On an outdoor grill, fire up enough charcoal to make a single layer under the chilies. When
coals are covered with gray ash, place the chilies directly over the fire. Grill chilies, turning
frequently, until their skins are blackened. Transfer chilies to paper bag to steam until cool
enough to handle. Peel chilies using rubber gloves if your skin is sensitive (and DON'T rub
your eyes), and cut chilies into 1/3-inch strips called rajas. You can then use them
immediately or freeze them until you are ready to use them."

And here are some recipes using them:

HATCH GREEN CHILI SALSA

(Yield: 11/2 quarts)

2 quarts water

1/2 pound fresh tomatillos (see cook's notes)

1/2 pound fresh serrano chili peppers (see cook's notes)

1 pound roasted Hatch green chili peppers

1/3 bunch cilantro

3 medium cloves garlic, peeled

1 medium white onion, peeled and diced

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

Cook's note: Tomatillos look like small green tomatoes with a papery, round husk.
Cook's note: To adjust the heat of the salsa, use more or fewer serrano chilies, as desired.

1. Place water in large pot and add tomatillos, serrano chilies, Hatch chilies, cilantro, garlic
and onion. Bring to boil and simmer for 30 minutes.

2. Strain liquid into a container and place solid ingredients in blender. (You may have to
work in batches.) Add 1/2 of the strained liquid to blender and blend until smooth.

3. Add lime juice and salt and blend 30 seconds. Chill before serving.

Presentation: Serve with chips, tortillas or in recipes calling for salsa. Can be stored
in a sealed container for 4 days in the refrigerator.

(Nutritional information (per 1/2 cup): 16 calories, 0.18 grams fat, no saturated fat,
no cholesterol, 535 milligrams sodium, 10 percent calories from fat.)

Source: Steve Stanley, Chuy's Restaurant


GRILLED GREEN ONIONS AND RAJAS

(Yield: 6 servings)

3 fresh poblano chilies or large New Mexican chilies such as Sandias or Hatch

12 large green onions

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Dash of Maggi seasoning or pinch of salt (see cook's note)

Juice of 1/2 lime

Cook's note: Maggi seasoning is a dark brown, bottled sauce that resembles soy sauce in
looks and taste. It can be found in Hispanic markets and in the Hispanic section of some
supermarkets.

1. On an outdoor grill, fire up enough charcoal to make a single layer under the vegetables.
When coals are covered with gray ash, place chilies directly over fire. Grill chilies, turning
frequently, until their skins are blackened. Transfer chilies to paper bag to steam until cool
enough to handle.

2. Peel chilies using rubber gloves if your skin is sensitive, and cut chilies into 1/3-inch
strips. Keep chili strips, or rajas, warm.

3. Trim any wilted portion of green from tips of onions. Rub onions with oil and Maggi
seasoning, if using.

3. Tear a piece of foil about 6 inches wide. Place it on one side of grill. Arrange onions so
that their green portions are on foil and bulbs are directly over fire. Grill, turning
frequently, until bulbs are soft and lightly browned, 5-10 minutes. Squeeze lime juice
over onions and sprinkle salt over them, if using.

Presentation: Serve onions with rajas and grilled meat.

(Nutritional information (per serving): 31 calories, 2 grams fat, 0.3 grams saturated fat,
no cholesterol, 46 milligrams sodium, 58 percent calories from fat.)

Source: "The Border Cookbook'' by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison
(Harvard Common Press, $14.95)


CHILI-RUBBED FRESH SALMON TACOS

(Yield: 2 tacos)

2 2-ounce salmon filets

Chili rub to taste (see cook's note)

1/2 to 1 tablespoon butter

2 flour tortillas

1/3 cup red cabbage, shredded

6 roasted Hatch green chili strips

1 to 2 tablespoons Jalapeno Lime Sauce (recipe follows)

4 to 6 fresh cilantro leaves

2 small lime wedges for garnish

Cook's note: Chili-rub spice blend can be found in the supermarket spice section.

1. Lightly dust salmon with chili rub.

2. Heat butter in skillet over medium heat and saute salmon, about 2 minutes
each side or until desired doneness. Meanwhile, heat or toast tortillas.

3. To assemble taco, fill tortillas with cabbage and 3 chili strips each. Place salmon
atop cabbage and chilies and top with Jalapeno Lime Sauce and cilantro. Fold tacos
and serve with lime wedges.

(Nutritional information (per serving): 262 calories, 13.5 grams fat, 4 grams saturated
fat, 46 milligrams cholesterol, 231 milligrams sodium, 46 percent calories from fat.)

JALAPENO LIME SAUCE

(Yield: 31/2 to 4 cups)

3 cups commercial Ranch dressing

1/4 cup roasted green chilies

1/4 cup pickled or marinated jalapeno chilies

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

1/3 bunch fresh cilantro

1/2 Roma tomato, diced

1. Place all ingredients in blender and blend until smooth. Chill and use as a salad dressing
or dip for tortilla chips.

(Nutritional information (per 1/3 cup): 165 calories, 16.9 grams fat, 2.5 grams saturated fat,
18 milligrams cholesterol, 227 milligrams sodium, 92 percent calories from fat.)

EL PASO GREEN CHILI SOUP

(Yield: 4 to 6 servings)

1/3 cup butter

11/2 medium onions, peeled and chopped

3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

4 cups chicken broth

2 baking potatoes, peeled and diced

11/2 cups chopped roasted green chilies, such as New Mexican Hatch chilies

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup half-and-half

4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, grated

Optional: freshly minced cilantro, for garnish

Optional: toasted thin corn tortilla strips, for garnish

1. In large saucepan or Dutch oven, warm butter over medium heat. Stir in onions
and garlic and saute until translucent.

2. Add broth, potatoes, chilies, oregano and salt and bring mixture to a boil. Reduce
heat to simmer and cook until potatoes are soft, about 30 minutes.

3. Transfer soup to a food processor (or blender in batches) and puree until smooth.
(Soup can be made ahead until this point and refrigerated for a day. Warm soup
before proceeding.)

4. Pour soup back into pan, add half-and-half, and heat through.

Presentation: Divide cheese among serving bowls. Ladle soup into each bowl.
Top soup with cilantro or tortilla strips, if desired. Serve immediately.

(Nutritional information (per serving): 290 calories, 20.1 grams fat, 12.2 grams
saturated fat, 55 milligrams cholesterol, 1263 milligrams sodium, 62 percent
calories from fat.)

Source: "The Border Cookbook''


HATCH NEW MEXICAN GREEN CHILI SAUCE (This is waht they mean when they ask
green or red in New Mexico - this is the green option)

(Yield: 4 cups)

3 tablespoons corn oil

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 cup chopped onion

2 teaspoons minced garlic

2 cups roasted, peeled, seeded and chopped New Mexican green chilies

2 cups beef broth

1 teaspoon salt

1. In heavy-bottomed sauce pan, saute onions in corn oil until they begin to brown.

2. Add garlic and cook another 2 minutes.

3. Stir flour in with onions and garlic so that it thickens.

4. Add chopped chilies, beef broth and salt and mix well. Bring to a boil and simmer
10 to 15 minutes to allow mixture to reduce. The sauce should be thick enough to bind
chilies and onions together. Sauce can be refrigerated for three days, or frozen.

Presentation: Serve sauce over enchiladas, grilled pork tenderloin or other grilled meats
and poultry, or as a side with beef tacos. You can also put it over scambled eggs or a cheese
omelet. In New Mexico they even offer it on hamburgers.

(Nutritional information (per 1/3 cup): 39 calories, 2.7 grams fat, 0.4 grams saturated fat,
no cholesterol, 233 milligrams sodium, 62 percent calories from fat.)

Source: Steve Stanley, Chuy's Restaurant
Sources: http://www.lubbockonline.com/news/100296/hatch.htm
AND My Time in New Mexico.





ok with some chili peppers?"

by: einlanzer on Aug 27 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Four stars
Ready to cook with some chili peppers? These recipes call for Sandia green chilies,
but you can try substituting a mixture of Anaheims and roasted jalapenos.

HATCH GREEN CHILI SALSA

(Yield: 11/2 quarts)

2 quarts water

1/2 pound fresh tomatillos (see cook's notes)

1/2 pound fresh serrano chili peppers (see cook's notes)

1 pound roasted Sandia green chili peppers

1/3 bunch cilantro

3 medium cloves garlic, peeled

1 medium white onion, peeled and diced

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice

DCook's note: Tomatillos look like small green tomatoes with a papery, round husk.
To adjust the heat of the salsa, use more or fewer serrano chilies, as desired.

1. Place water in large pot and add tomatillos, serrano chilies, Sandia chilies, cilantro,
garlic and onion. Bring to boil and simmer for 30 minutes.

2. Strain liquid into a container and place solid ingredients in blender. (You may have
to work in batches.) Add 1/2 of the strained liquid to blender and blend until smooth.

3. Add lime juice and salt and blend 30 seconds. Chill before serving.

Presentation: Serve with chips, tortillas or in recipes calling for salsa. Can be stored in
a sealed container for 4 days in the refrigerator.

(Nutritional information (per 1/2 cup): 16 calories, 0.18 grams fat, no saturated fat,
no cholesterol, 535 milligrams sodium, 10 percent calories from fat.)
Sources: Steve Stanley, Chuy's Restaurant
L




"Lots of options"

by: newfietom on Aug 28 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Four stars

How many do you have? A dozen? A case? More?

In the parts of the country where chilis are grown -- including Hatch, NM where they
grow the BEST -- you often see roadside stands where you can buy chilis raw or roasted.
The roasting at these stands is done in a large cylindrical basket with a pretty aggressive
propane flame. The basket is rotated either by hand or by some simple machine attachment.
(By the way, foodies... if you're in "chili country" at harvest time, you will enjoy the smell of
roasting chilis as you drive by farm stand after farm stand selling their product.
DELIGHTFUL!!!)

Roasting more than a case (bushel) of chilis would be a big job without this kind of contraption,
but my guess is you don't have that many to roast.

You can do any of the following to get the same basic results:

1. If a couple at a time, just place them directly on your stove burner (gas or electric).
Watch carefully and turn them often until the skin chars black.

2. Broil them on a sheet pan with a rack under your oven's broiler. Watch and turn...
same as above.

3. Use your outdoor grill. Place the chilis directly over a hot bed of coals. Ditto the watch
and turn. Personally, I like this method because of the added flavors the grill brings to
the equation.

4. Fry them in a deep fryer til the skins blister (this is probably not the best way and I
would recommend either of the above first.)


The desired result is twofold: You want to char the skin of the pepper which will flavor
the flesh of the fruit. Second, you want to remove the skins. To accomplish this,
place the HOT chilis in a sealable plastic bag, paper sack (doubled and folded over
at the top) or other sealable vessel. The residual heat will loosen the skin and make
them easy to remove. Then, if you're not going to use all you've roasted immediately,
simply place them in a freezer bag (I use smaller bags with single-use portions) and
toss them in the freezer.


Google Map
Full-screen

Where the BEST chili is grown!

Address:

Hatch, NM
Get directions:

Enter your starting address
Location
Directions
Map data ©2009 Tele Atlas, INEGI - Terms of Use
Map
Satellite
Hybrid
push-pin
You can often get a fresh case shipped to you. Try an internet search.




"This is a site with some recipes for using Hatch peppers"

by: KathyB on Aug 23 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Three stars
This is for a lot of recipes.

http://www.nmchili.com/recipes.htm


There is also a Hatch Cookbook if you want to go that far. This link
will give you sources to get it.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=hatch+cookbook&btnG=Google+Search

Sources: nmchili.com





"Classically, Chiles Rellenos."

by: PamPerdue on Aug 24 2007 (24 months ago)
Official Rating
Three stars
The classic recipe for peppers like those is Chiles Rellenos (stuffed with cheese,
covered in batter, and deep-fried.) The link goes to a recipe.

To prepare the fresh chiles, you need to roast them. Basically, you subject them to
very high heat (directly in the flame of a gas stove, over a very hot grill, or under
the broiler) until the skins turn black and blistered. Then you throw them in a
paper bag, to let the steam loosen the skins. When cool enough to handle, rub
the skins off.

For Rellenos, you make a slit, remove the seeds, and stuff.

The deep-frying step is a pain, so what you can do at that point is to just chop
the chiles and use them in just about any Mexican dish. They make a nice stuffing
for enchiladas, added to quesadillas, etc.

They freeze very well at that point. People in Hatch (and the rest of New Mexico)
will buy their chiles 50 pounds at a time, roast them (the grocery store will roast
them for you), and freeze them in small tubs to use all year long.

The chiles in Hatch are the most prized for this purpose. For those who have to buy
their chiles pre-frozen, the Bueno brand is favored. You can use your homemade
chopped roasted chiles in any of their recipes."


I I hope that you all enjoy these chilis and the recipes!
We live for Hatch time to come around!

Ruth Ann
http://www.r2swanger.etsy.com